Moving Across the Country Solo, Yolo

It's no secret that I moved across the country.Solo. Not knowing a single soul. To a city that I've never been to.

It kind of sounds like a story straight out of some book, some where, but it's my own real life story. A lot of people ask why I did it. I've written a variety of blog posts on it. You can read it herehere, and my first year recap. No one asks how I did it. How does one decide on a new city to move to? How does one do it on their own?

Choosing a City: I made a list of cities that I wanted to live in. After making my list, I made a list of why I wanted to live in those cities. I researched facts about these cities and created a pros and cons list. I hung up my pros and cons list and would look at them while I pondered which city I wanted to move to. Eventually, I picked my top two cities, NYC and Boston. After picking my top two cities, I researched each city a little more thoroughly. I came to realize that Boston was the better city. Everything I was reading said Boston was like NYC, just smaller and cleaner. Also, more affordable. I settled and chose Boston.

Knowing Your New City: It's really hard to get an idea of your future new city. Especially when you live 3,000 miles away and have never been. Ideally, one would want to go visit to make sure they really do like the city before moving, but I'm unique so I do things my way.

I began to research Boston like crazy. I read reviews. I looked into which neighborhoods I should live in. I searched for everything I could to know about it. While I was searching, I discovered a book that was all about Boston. I highly recommend this book. It's called the Newcomer's Handbook For Moving to and Living in Boston. This book lists all the neighborhoods, Boston terms, finding a place to live, moving and storage, money matters, getting settled, helpful services, shopping for the home, childcare and education, getting involved, cultural life, calendar of events, health care, green living, sports and recreation, greenspaces, useful phone numbers and websites, transportation, quick getaways, temporary lodgings, and weather and climate. It's a really handy book and I learned so much more about Boston before moving.

sidenote: They also have handbooks for Atlanta, Chicago, London, LA, Portland {{ Oregon}}, Minneapolis - St. Paul, NYC, San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, Texas, USA, and Washington D.C.

Once I arrived in Boston, so many things from the book made sense. I also studied the Boston lingo so I could blend in a little more and act like I knew what people were talking about. I wanted to seem like a local before I could really be a "local."

How to do It: Once I decided I was moving to a new city, I began to save as much money as I possibly could. I didn't know if I would have a job by the time I was ready to move or not, so I knew I needed some money in my savings so I could make this move possible. Luckily for me, I ended up finding a job. I have student loans still, so I paid a little extra on each monthly payment so if I couldn't pay them for whatever reason when I moved, I would be ahead in payments. I also set up an account on Mint.com. It's a financial website where you can input your bank accounts, loans, etc and keep track of where your money is going. You can also set goals that tracks money going into a certain account and Mint will tell you how much you should put in that account each month. It's a really neat site, and I recommend you looking into it if you're looking for a financial website. If you're not sure if it's safe, the site is made by Intuit, which is the same company that makes QuickBooks.

Moving across the country {{ or to another state }} is entirely possible. It's a little frightening at first, but if you have the determination to do it, you'll be fine.

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